The following significant structures or places are within Aberdeenshire: There are numerous rivers and burns in Aberdeenshire, including Cowie Water, Carron Water, Burn of Muchalls, River Dee, River Don, River Ury, River Ythan, Water of Feugh, Burn of Myrehouse, Laeca Burn and Luther Water. [2], Aberdeenshire is one of the most homogeneous/indigenous regions of the UK. [5], After the end of the Revolution of 1688, an extended peaceful period was interrupted only by such fleeting events such as the Rising of 1715 and the Rising of 1745. Aberdeenshire borders onto Angus and Perth and Kinross to the south, Highland and Moray to the west and Aberdeen City to the east. The majority of employees work within the service sector, predominantly in public administration, education and health. Media related to Lumsden, Aberdeenshire at Wikimedia Commons; Lumsden in the Gazetteer for Scotland This Aberdeenshire location article is a stub. of Aberdeenshire, principally into Aberdeen City.[2]. Macbeth fell at Lumphanan in 1057. This is lower than the average rates for Aberdeen City (2.3%), Scotland (4.2%) and the UK (3.8%). Population estimates for Aberdeen's 13 wards, disaggregated by 5-year age groups and also … The Gordon family adhered to Catholicism and the Forbeses to Protestantism. Aberdeenshire's population has increased by 9.1% since 2001, while Scotland's total population grew by 3.8%. List of Category A listed buildings in Aberdeenshire, Land Register Counties & Operational Dates, "C.Michael Hogan, ''Elsick Mounth'', Megalithic Portal, ed. Viewmap of Aberdeenshire. The Education, Learning and Leisure Service takes the largest share of budget (52.3%), followed by Housing and Social Work (24.3%), Infrastructure Services (15.9%), Joint Boards (such as Fire and Police) and Misc services (7.9%) and Trading Activities (0.4%). Along with his victory came new families, namely the Forbeses and the Gordons. The demography of Scotland includes all aspects of population, past and present, in the area that is now Scotland.Scotland has a population of 5,463,300, as of 2019. It lies in the centre of what was the ancient parish of Longside, which was established in 1641 and covered an extensive area. View updates on coronavirus (COVID-19) and council services. At the end of each year, a new series of population estimates, from the census date forward, is used to revise the postcensal estimates, including the population clock projections series. (but could administer it on paper if that was more feasible). Explanation: Localities according to the definition of 2016. The county boundaries are officially used for a few purposes, namely land registration and lieutenancy.[1]. Aberdeenshire Council home page. [5], The population of the council area has risen over 50% since 1971 to approximately 261,470,[10] representing 4.7% of Scotland's total. In 1996, under the Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994, the Banff and Buchan district, Gordon district and Kincardine and Deeside district were merged to form the present Aberdeenshire council area. Methodology. Aberdeenshire Council home page. It takes its name from the County of Aberdeen which has substantially different boundaries. It covers an area of 6,313 square kilometres (2,437 sq mi). The world's population is aging. If you are affected and need assistance, please visit … Aberdeenshire (Scots: Aiberdeenshire; Scottish Gaelic: Siorrachd Obar Dheathain) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland. The 2011 census recorded the population of Kintore at … [5], The present council area is named after the historic county of Aberdeenshire, which has different boundaries and was abandoned as an administrative area in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973. Population In 2017 Aberdeenshire’s population was estimated to be 261,800, approximately 5% of Scotland’s total population of 5,424,800. Aberdeen's population is slightly older than Scotland as a whole with 16.4% of the population under 16, compared to the national average of 19%. Aberdeenshire is in the rain shadow of the Grampians, therefore it is a generally dry climate, with portions of the coast, receiving 25 inches (64 cm) of moisture annually. Aberdeen International Airport offers flights and connections to over 45 destinations. There were 37 cases in Aberdeenshire compared to 31 in 2018. Between 2012 and 2014 the combined Aberdeenshire and Aberdeen City economic forecast GDP growth rate is 8.6%, the highest growth rate of any local council area in the UK and above the Scottish rate of 4.8%.[2]. Aberdeenshire, City of Edinburgh, Midlothian, North Ayrshire, South Ayrshire Training ... learning disabilities known to authorities per 1,000 of the population was 5.2. At a population level, higher numbers of ACEs are associated with a higher risk of In 2011 82.2% of residents identified as 'White Scottish', followed by 12.3% who are 'White British', whilst ethnic minorities constitute only 0.9% of the population. It is one of the most extensive counties in the kingdom and is bounded on the north by the Moray Firth, on the east by the German Ocean, on the south by the counties of Perth, Angus, and Kincardine, and on the west by the counties of Banff and Inverness. The population growth rate in 2011 was estimated as 0.6% per annum according to the 2011 GROS Annual Review. [5] Stone circles and cairns were constructed predominantly in this era. Population Pyramids of Scotland. [5] The Picts were the next documented inhabitants of the area, and were no later than 800–900 AD. Aberdeenshire Profile 2018 (pdf 927KB) presents facts, figures and information about the area including population, age structure, housing, economy, employment, transport links, broadband, environment, climate change, council political make up and budget. View updates on coronavirus (COVID-19) and council services.. A postcode checker has been launched to make it easy to find out what the COVID protection level is where you live. Aberdeenshire's economy is closely linked to Aberdeen City's (GDP £7,906m) and in 2011 the region as a whole was calculated to contribute 16.8% of Scotland's GDP. the number of ACEs an individual has experienced) was designed for population-level research and not intended to inform practice at the individual level. Media related to Lumsden, Aberdeenshire at Wikimedia Commons; Lumsden in the Gazetteer for Scotland This Aberdeenshire location article is a stub. Aberdeenshire played an important role in the fighting between the Scottish clans. Local government functions were shared between the two levels. 8% of Aberdonians are from a non-white ethnic minority, including 4.3% … These are indicators for much wider ranges of experiences. You can also view more detailed population totals for Aberdeenshire: More detail about population and households for Aberdeenshire and Scotland including projected change in the future can be found on the National Records of Scotland (NRS) website. Almost 19% of employment is within the public sector. The census lists a relatively high proportion of under 16s and slightly fewer people of working-age compared with the Scottish average. 8. [citation needed] References. Over 60-year-olds are growing faster than all younger age groups and Europe is leading the demographic change. [5] When the fighting amongst these newcomers resulted in the Scottish Wars of Independence, the English king Edward I traveled across the area twice, in 1296 and 1303. The 2011 census found that 92% of the population is ethnically white. Across Scotland, there have been 833 probable suicides registered in 2019, up 6.25% on the 784 recorded a year previous. Average Gross Weekly Earnings (for full-time employees employed in work places in Aberdeenshire in 2011) are £572.60. The Scottish Agricultural College also has a campus in Aberdeenshire, offering a wide range of agricultural-based courses. Disclaimer The method used to create these profiles is still under development and unfortunately do not allow us to make them fully accessible at this point. adults (NHS Health Scotland 2019). Population. (Boundary map). The average monthly unemployment (claimant count) rate for Aberdeenshire in 2011 was 1.5%. the number of ACEs an individual has experienced) was designed for population-level research and not intended to inform practice at the individual level. Population In 2017 Aberdeenshire’s population was estimated to be 261,800, approximately 5% of Scotland’s total population of 5,424,800. It is the locus of a large number of Neolithic and Bronze Age archaeological sites, including Longman Hill, Kempstone Hill, Catto Long Barrow and Cairn Lee. The projections are based on a monthly series of population estimates starting with the April 1, 2010 resident population from the 2010 Census. At a population level, higher numbers of ACEs are associated with a higher risk of You can also view: updates on coronavirus (COVID-19) and council services, Grampian Coronavirus (COVID-19) Assistance Hub, Population and household estimates and projections, administrative areas and wards (pdf 34KB). Population Census 2001-04-29 Population Census 2011-03-27 Population Estimate 2016-06-30 Population Estimate 2019-06-30 ; Peterhead: Aberdeenshire: 18,050: 18,540: 19,270: 18,820 → Andy Burnham", "Population Estimates for UK, England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, Mid-2019", "Aberdeenshire Council Identity in 2011 Census", https://www.aberdeenshire.gov.uk/media/24618/inverurietownprofile.pdf, "Scottish Lib Dems: Aberdeenshire Councillor joins Scottish Liberal Democrats", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aberdeenshire&oldid=992165442, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing Scottish Gaelic-language text, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 3 December 2020, at 21:09. Population Census 2001-04-29 Population Census 2011-03-27 Population Estimate 2016-06-30 Population Estimate 2019-06-30 ; Aboyne: Aberdeenshire: 2,280: 2,600: 2,910: 2,880 → [citation needed] References. During this period the population has had periods of decrease as well as increase. This represents a small fall of 330 people since 2017 and is the second consecutive year that Aberdeenshire’s population has fallen. How this structure compares to the north of Britain, Scotland, and its surrounding Isles is less clear. Population Estimates Time Series Data. Population Estimate 2019-06-30 ; Aberdeen City: Council Area: 212,125: 222,793: 229,840: … The council has devolved power to six area committees: Banff and Buchan; Buchan; Formartine; Garioch; Marr; and Kincardine and Mearns. [5] Around the 1st century AD, the Taexali people, who have left little history, were believed to have resided along the coast. The population in 2009 is 344, a decline to levels before 1861. Traditionally, it has been economically dependent upon the primary sector (agriculture, fishing, and forestry) and related processing industries. Population Estimate 1981-06-30 Population Estimate 1991-06-30 Population Estimate 2001-06-30 Population Estimate 2011-06-30 Population Estimate 2019-06-30; Aberdeenshire: Council Area: 188,923: 215,870: 226,940: 253,650: 261,210: Great Britain and Northern Ireland: United Kingdom: 56,357,500: 57,438,700: 59,113,000: 63,285,145: 66,796,807 The present Aberdeenshire council area consists of all of the historic counties of Aberdeenshire and Kincardineshire (except the area of those two counties making up the City of Aberdeen), as well as northeast portions of Banffshire. Development pressure continues to be strong [citation needed] and the town's population now exceeds 7,500. Crimes and offences recorded by the police per 10,000 population in Scotland in 2019/20, by local authority [Graph]. The 2011 census found that 92% of the population is ethnically white. It was replaced by Grampian Regional Council and five district councils: Banff and Buchan, Gordon, Kincardine and Deeside, Moray and the City of Aberdeen. In 2019, Dundee City Council was the local authority with the most In terms of colleges, the North East College has several campuses across Aberdeen City offering a huge variety of courses. The fourteen biggest settlements in Aberdeenshire (with 2011 population estimates) are: Aberdeenshire's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is estimated at £3,496m (2011), representing 5.2% of the Scottish total. Crimes and offences recorded by the police per 10,000 population in Scotland in 2019/20, by local authority [Graph]. [5] This rivalry grew worse during and after the Protestant Reformation, when religion was another reason for conflict between the clans. The drop in population between 2015 and 2016 brings to an end an 11-year period of year-on-year population …