Digging out the roots would be ideal if it were possible as this would prevent further suckers. Staghorn sumac is one of the largest native sumacs reaching up to 25 feet tall and wide.A large, open, colony-forming shrub that spreads by runners. Cold Stream Farm supplies Staghorn Sumac shrubs which are grown as bare root seedlings and transplants and sold both wholesale and retail with no minimum order. It's not a plant for a small residential yard or garden, unless you confine the roots or enjoy the never-ending job of pulling out sumac suckers. Staghorn Sumac's can grow up to 6 m high, 10 cm in diameter and 50 years old. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) grows just about anywhere and everywhere all across the eastern part of the United States. Leaf margins are finely toothed. 'Laciniata'): Wide-spreading, colony forming reaching 8 to 10 feet high and 12 to 15 feet wide. Animals. Excellent fall colour and distinctive red fruit. Unfortunately this is a common problem with Sumachs as they respond by profuse suckering when the main stem is removed. This is an open, spreading shrub (sometimes a small tree) that typically grows 15-25 tall. Rhus typhina, commonly called staghorn sumac, is the largest of the North American sumacs. The lateral root system is extensive and spread outward three or more feet a year. Family Anacardiaceae ... Plant range North America Characteristics . Its far-reaching, shallow root system prevents soil erosion along stream banks and on sloping sites. Open areas; On sandy or rocky soils; Light tolerance. There are 250 geniuses of Sumac which can grow anywhere from four to 35 feet in size. Wildlife: Fruit is eaten by turkey, ruffed grouse, bobwhite, pheasant, and many others. After their roots have developed sufficiently, typically in one or two years, move them to their permanent locations. Water well to settle soil around the root ball. Making the tea is easy. Ring-necked pheasant, bobwhite quail, wild turkey, and about 300 species of songbirds include sumac … This plant has some cultivated varieties. 30 FLAMELEAF Sumac Tree Shining Dwarf Winged Rhus Schmaltzia Copallina Seeds 1.0 out of 5 stars 1. Sumac plant is said to be used as a serious defense against the micronutrient, especially salmonella Typhimurium. Staghorn sumac suckers from wide-spreading roots to form large multistemmed colonies many yards across---rather like bamboo. Big game. Our future. Staghorn Sumac 20 Seeds - Rhus typhina - Outdoors or Bonsai 2.5 out of 5 stars 11. Staghorn sumac – Rhus typhina. Staghorn Sumac, like many of our favorite edibles, is technically classified as a weed! Staghorn Sumac Tea. It can grow under a wide array of conditions, but is most often found in dry and poor soil on which other plants cannot survive. The trunk is forked and spreading, which is the reason it provides such good cover for many animals. Good erosion control plant as it spreads by root suckers forming colonies and thickets. This is a suckering shrub that will form thickets in the wild via self-seeding and root suckering. Plant it where it has room to spread, or use an underground root barrier to keep it confined. The fall show is difficult to miss, with dazzling displays of red, orange and yellow leaves. Foliage Deciduous. Cultivars are plants produced in cultivation by selective breeding or via vegetative propagation from wild plants identified to have desirable traits.". Among the most recognizable characteristics are large, upright clusters of fuzzy red fruits that appear above the branches in late summer on female plants. Common English name: Staghorn sumac. In light of this, sumac tea is becoming more popular. But Sumachs are deep rooted and you have probably found that this is a difficult and arduous task. Staghorn Sumac Tree Facts. The sumac is a considered a small tree or shrub, growing on average about 15 feet tall. Each leaflet is linear in shape, dark green and hairy above with a smooth, white color beneath. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 40 years or more. Drought and salt tolerant. Staghorn sumac is an excellent addition to a windbreak if the spreading root suckers will not cause problems. Waterfowl and Upland Birds. Propagation. Brilliant compact varieties like Tiger Eyes® Sumac can easily be substituted in smaller yards. Cultivated plants prefer ... Landscape Uses. Yet another name for sumac is staghorn. Staghorn Sumac will grow to be about 19 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 25 feet. Staghorn sumac self-propagates from root suckers. Wild staghorn sumac flourishes in the sandy or rocky soils along fence rows and in abandoned fields. Will sucker and form a nice colony. Plant the staghorn sumac 1 inch higher than it was in the pot. Alternate, large compound leaves with 11 to 25 leaflets. This large shrub has compound leaves, meaning each leaf is composed of several leaflets. Mature Height: 15 ft Soil / Climate: Grows well in low nutrient soils, sun and shade. Intolerant of shade; Associated species. Use up and down arrow keys to explore within a submenu. Poison sumac (Toxicodendron vernix) has leaves somewhat similar to staghorn sumac. Used as a garden plant, staghorn sumac and its cutleaf variety thrive in full sun or light shade with little or no watering, once established. You can search, browse, and learn more about the plants in our living collections by visiting our BRAHMS website. C-Value:  1 Family Anacardiaceae . The plant's purple-red branches make striking winter silhouettes against blue-green- or golden-needled conifers. Wildlife: Fruit is eaten by turkey, ruffed grouse, bobwhite, pheasant, and many others. Staghorn Sumac. Exceptionally hard seed coats make propagating staghorn sumac from seed a very difficult, time-consuming process. It offers a wonderful contrast between rugged performance and a gracefully open form and delicate pinnate compound leaves. "This species is native to the Chicago Region according to Swink and Wilhelm's Plants of the Chicago Region, with updates made according to current research.". A multi-season native shrub is the staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina). Fruits of the Staghorn Sumac are 3-5 mm across and red and juicy when mature. In Stock. Deer resistant. The young branches have a fuzzy texture similar to a deer's antlers when in velvet. The thick branches are hairy and resemble the velvety antlers of a male deer (stag), hence the common name of “staghorn.” Clusters o… Plants for a Future Database: Rhus Typhina, Fine Gardening: Rhus Typhina “Tigereye Bailtiger” (Tiger Eyes Sumac, Staghorn Sumac, Velvet Sumac), Yale University Marsh Botanical Garden: Plant of the Week -- Staghorn Sumac, Macphail Woods Ecological Forestry Project: Staghorn Sumac, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center: Rhus Typhina. Choose a spot showcasing the sumac’s dramatic foliage, bright berries, autumn color and bare, antlerlike winter branches. Hardiness zone(s) 3a, 3b. Best in full sun and well-drained soil.Spreads by root suckers to form large colonies. It is native to woodland edges, roadsides, railroad embankments and stream/swamp margins from Quebec to Ontario to Minnesota south to Georgia, Indiana and Iowa. All ratings refer to the UK growing conditions unless otherwise stated. Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menus and submenus. Poison sumac (Toxicodendron vernix) has leaves somewhat similar to staghorn sumac. Its open habit and hairy stems resemble horns on a male deer, giving staghorn sumac its name. That’s why the sumac plant is also known as the lemonade tree. Deer/Wildlife Politics. Staghorn sumac. Moreover, they both are tall shrubs (sometimes reaching about 30 feet tall), deciduous, and native to eastern North America. It naturally tends to branch to the ground, but it can be pruned to produce a more tree-like effect that is suited to the Japanese Garden or as a specimen plant. Dwarf Cultivar. Leaflets are lance-shaped to narrowly oblong with a pointed tip, 2 to 5 inches long with coarsely toothed margins. The foliage of large, pinnate, bright-green leaves, 24 in. Use up and down arrow keys to explore within a submenu. Flowers are dense yellow-green and fragrant. Other notes. Studies have shown that the sumac plant is effective in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac By Robert Newgarden | December 1, 1997 Drought tolerant, pest resistant, and wildlife friendly, cutleaf staghorn sumac (Rhustyphina 'Laciniata') deserves to be more popular.This native plant can grow as either a large shrub or small tree, and it has long, fernlike leaves that turn a variety of gorgeous colors in autumn. In the spring, female aphids lay an egg on the underside of a sumac leaf, causing the plant to form an abnormal growth, or gall, around the egg. They seem to always take on a dome-like shape. Like the species staghorn sumac, Tiger Eyes has a shallow root system and benefits from some mulch, especially at first. Poison sumac is not edible, and like any foraged plant or ‘shroom, you should be 110% sure of what you’ve found before eating it. All it needs is an abandoned field, highway median or roadside ditch and it’s happy as can be. stands will spread from the root sprouts. It is one of the last plants to leaf out in the spring with bright green leaves that change to an attractive yellow, orange, and scarlet in fall. Some species tolerate part shade, but limited exposure to sunlight may lead to looser plant habits and muted coloring. Habitat Management. long (60 cm), turns striking shades of orange, yellow and scarlet in fall. Rhus typhina aka Staghorn Sumac, Velvet Sumac and Sumac Vinegar Tree is extremely hardy. Their cloning habit is what gives sumac stand their dome-like appearance. Their cloning habit is what gives sumac stand their dome-like appearance. North shore of Lake Superior east to Nova Scotia. Shallow, wide-spreading roots make sumac a good choice for soil conservation along slopes, streams and pond-sides if the soil is well-drained. Winged sumac occurs in glades, upland prairies, savannas, openings of upland forests, and open disturbed areas. Smooth sumac (Rhus glabra) and staghorn sumac (R. typhina) are the most common and readily available landscape species. Large Equipment. It will grow where other plants struggle and easily adapts to poor soils. Explore this online platform for Chicago-area residents to share their favorite stories about trees. Sumac Basics. It is particularly noted for the reddish-brown hairs that cover the young branchlets in somewhat the same way that velvet covers the horns of a stag (male deer), hence t… “Cutleaf” staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina laciniata) is an especially beautiful form with finely divided leaflets. Noteworthy Characteristics . Tiger Eyes sumac is different from the typical staghorn sumac in several ways. Cultivated plants prefer fertile, well-drained locations in flood-free zones. Staghorn Sumac is a wide-spreading large shrub developing a flat-topped appearance. Some beekeepers use dried sumac bobs as a source of fuel for their smokers. These 15- to 25-foot trees thrive across U.S. Department of Agriculture zones 3 through 8. Rhus typhina L. Anacardiaceae (Cashew family) Life cycle. By David Taylor. Trail Cameras and Drones. Pruning - After Planting. The Morton Arboretum is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that relies on the generosity of members and donors. Beginners at plant identification can easily confuse poison sumac and non-rash-causing types of sumac such as staghorn sumac.Indeed, the plants are related. Follow our advice on planting shrubs; Propagation through root cuttings in fall, but you can also just wait for it to send shoots up from the running roots and dig those out. Our communities. Land Tours. What are Good Trees to Plant Near a Street? $3.99. Finely divided green leaves, ferny-like. The conical, fuzzy berry clusters appear on female trees. Very adaptable to most growing conditions, from poor soils to drought conditions. Firm the soil around the plant. Sumac is a fairly common plant, and you were probably taught for years that it is poisonous and should be avoided. Get expert help from The Morton Arboretum Plant Clinic. How to get rid of invasive sumach tree suckers. The stems and leaf petioles of the staghorn sumac are covered in a light, rust-colored velvet. Cover the surface of the root ball with mulch. No information available. Staghorn sumac gets its name from its thick, velvety upper branches, which resemble the antlers of young male deer. ; Soil pH: 5.5-7.0; Plant Size: 5 meters (16 feet) tall Duration: Perennial Shrub Leaf Shape: Odd Pinnate compound leaves with 9-31 leaflets; Leaf Phyllotaxis (Arrangement) on branch: Alternate; Leaf Size: Each leaflet is 6-11 cm (2 1/3 to 4 1/3 inches) long Fruit forms in dense, bright red, compact clusters, and persists thoughout winter. Photos. staghorn sumac This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in … It spreads partly by rhizomes and forms dense thickets that create a canopy of leaves at the top but have a lot of open space between the branches underneath, which provides excellent cover for birds and many mammals. It still suckers but the plants I have been watching for the past five years confine the suckers close to the base of the original plant and it will take the colony considerable time to spread out of its original planting zone. Unwanted suckers can be mowed or removed to keep plants managable.Does not tolerat wet sites. All parts of the staghorn sumac, except the roots, can be used as a natural dye. Some species tolerate part shade, but limited exposure to sunlight may lead to looser plant habits and muted coloring. Prized for its spectacular fall foliage and showy fruits, Rhus typhina (Staghorn Sumac) is a large suckering deciduous shrub or small tree with picturesque branches and velvety reddish-brown branchlets. Genus Rhus can be deciduous or evergreen shrubs or trees with simple, pinnate or palmately-divided leaves often colouring brilliantly in autumn, and inconspicuous yellow flowers in spring or summer, followed … The leaf stalk (rachis) and petioles are also hairy. Attracts pollinators. Typically found in large colonies; Range . Transplant the shoots to a prepared nursery bed with consistently moist, well-mulched soil. Sharing a genus with poison sumac (Rhus vernix) has unnecessarily blackballed staghorn sumac (R. typhina) from inclusion in many landscape plans. It tends to be a little leggy, with a typical clearance of 5 feet from the ground, and is suitable for planting under power lines. Staghorn sumac suckers from wide-spreading roots to form large multistemmed colonies many yards across---rather like bamboo. Because of this, staghorn sumac can make a beautiful landscape tree. Upright to rounded, reaching 5 to 6 feet high and wide. This clear waste attracts foliage-marring sooty mold. Tolerates a wide range of climates. Alternate, pinnately compound with nine to 31 leaflets approaching 24 inches long. Have tree and plant questions? Staghorn Sumac Tea. Rhus typhina, commonly called staghorn sumac, is the largest of the North American sumacs. This sprouting is encouraged by cutting or fire injury. In fact, most people say it tastes like lemonade. Excellent fall color and distinctive red fruit. On one hand, it’s a spreader/colonizer that requires de-suckering. “This plant is a cultivar of a species that is native to the Chicago Region according to Swink and Wilhelm's Plants of the Chicago Region, with updates made according to current research. Minimum temperature ranges (in degrees C) are shown in brackets . Backfill the hole with soil, making sure the top of the root ball is visible and slightly higher than the soil around it. Sumac can be used in clumps for more natural plantings, or as a single specimen with root suckers controlled by mowing. Does not tolerate shade or wet soil. Branches have a hairy texture. Within a submenu, use escape to move to top level menu parent. Shallow, wide-spreading roots make sumac a good choice for soil conservation along slopes, streams and pond-sides if the soil is well-drained. Orange, red and yellow fall color. … It’s also pleasant tasting. Colony-forming shrub to small tree. MN/WI/National Deer Issues. Orange, red and yellow fall color. Caterpillars of many moths and butterflies eat the foliage. In light of this, sumac tea is becoming more popular. Sumac will spread from root suckers. According to laboratory results, sumac, a very … Everything Water - Ponds/Fishing/Etc. The sumac's tropical, green compound foliage assumes fiery shades of orange, scarlet and gold in fall. This will allow water to run off the root ball. Food plots. Height: 15-30 feet Photo by Chris Earley. Sap-consuming sumac psyllid, aphid and soft-scale insects coat its leaves in honeydew. Other potential diseases include fungal leaf-spot or canker infections and fatal Armillaria root rot. It is native to woodland edges, roadsides, railroad embankments and stream/swamp margins from Quebec to Ontario to Minnesota south to Georgia, Indiana and Iowa. Staghorn sumac’s shortcomings include fragile bark susceptible to lawn-mower or string-trimmer damage. Unwanted suckers can be mowed or removed to keep plants managable. Three common species grown in the United States are staghorn sumac, fragrant sumac, and smooth sumac. Use enter to activate. Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina 'Laciniata'): Wide-spreading, colony forming reaching 8 to 10 feet high and 12 to 15 feet wide. Staghorn sumac is often used in mass plantings, for naturalizing, or on steep slopes. Yet another name for sumac is staghorn. White powdery mildew also disfigures the leaves. Zone 0; Zone 1; Zone 2; Zone 3; Zone 4 ; Zone 5; Zone 6; Zone 7; Zone 8; Zone 9; A hardiness zone is a geographically defined area where a given plant is capable of growing. Or, more accurately, staghorn sumac. It is one of the first tree species to colonize … It is primarily found in southeastern Canada, the northeastern and midwestern United States, and the Appalachian Mountains, [3] but it is widely cultivated as an ornamental throughout the temperate world. Plant sumac in full sun. Remove a 2- to 6-inch section of the root in late winter or early spring. Dioecous, separate male and female flowers on separate plants.Large, dense terminal clusters of greenish yellow, up to 12 inches long appear in June and July. Start new plants by digging up emerging shoots from around the base of the plant in early spring, before their leaves appear. Cutting it back to the ground in midwinter every three of four years reinvigorates the plant. Attracts pollinators. Staghorn sumac is very common throughout most of Ontario. Hardiness ratings. What most commonly grows across North America is a close cousin in the sumac family, rhus typhina or more commonly called Staghorn Sumac. Management Sumac stands can best be maintained by eliminating competing vegetation by mowing, chemicals, or fire. Passionate for travel and the well-written word, Judy Wolfe is a professional writer with a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from Cal Poly Pomona and a certificate in advanced floral design. Species in this family range from medium-sized trees to herbs a few inches high. USDA Plant Hardiness Zone: 5-8 (More information on hardiness zones). The Staghorn Sumac is a large spreading shrub that is a great plant for use in areas where its utility value and ornamental value can be appreciated. Her thousands of published articles cover topics from travel and gardening to pet care and technology. Staghorn sumac is often used in mass plantings, for naturalizing, or on steep slopes. Take a step back and look at a staghorn sumac population. Mature bark is thin and gray with raised lenticels. Moreover, they both are tall shrubs (sometimes reaching about 30 feet tall), deciduous, and native to eastern North America. Sounds as though your Staghorn tree (Sumach) is taking over! Fruit Trees. Once a single individual becomes established, it sends … Golden-leaf cultivars such as Tiger Eyes (a staghorn sumac) need some shelter from the afternoon sun to prevent leaf burn. Site. It’s also pleasant tasting. Beginners at plant identification can easily confuse poison sumac and non-rash-causing types of sumac such as staghorn sumac.Indeed, the plants are related. The sumac that is used in the spice blend is one member of the sumac family (genus, rhus), rhus coriraria or more commonly called European Sumac. All parts of the staghorn sumac, except the roots, can be used as a natural dye. Stop by, email, or call. They are highly appealing to birds. Most strikingly, they share a trait that draws much attention to them in autumn: extremely colorful fall foliage. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) is a small tree with branches that spread to make a small rounded crown. This is a very effective weapon against germs when it is used as a mixture of sumac and thyme oil together. Staghorn sumac grows extremely fast, make sure you’ve given it enough space to spread out. Thus, all the aphids inside the gall are identical clones of one another. Problems. Staghorn sumac is dioecious, meaning that it has individually male and female plants. Smooth sumac occurs in open woods, brushy areas along roadsides, and fencerows. It forms numerous clones from underground roots so that it is rare to see just one tree. Place the pot in an area that is at least 15.6 degrees Celsius until the sucker has rooted. Latin name: Rhus typhina L. French name: Sumac vinaigrier; Synonym(s): Velvet sumac Taxonomic Serial Number ... Root system. staghorn sumac This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in … Staghorn sumac gets its name from its thick, velvety upper branches, which resemble the antlers of young male deer. Equipment/Real Estate/For Sale. Building the urban forest for 2050. A large, open, colony-forming shrub that spreads by runners. This nontoxic tree’s crimson summer berries once provided thirsty Native Americans and frontier folk with a refreshingly lemon-flavored tea. Its brittle branches snap in heavy wind. Fruit is often persistent through winter. General habitat. Hardiness. Because of its spreading nature, this plant may be restricted in some areas. Branches have a hairy texture. Pruning should occur either before or as soon after planting as possible. Habitat. Fruit clusters are long and tight, and covered with the same velvety fur. It does not mix well with other shrubs or perennials in a border or foundation planting. From top level menus, use escape to exit the menu. Fruit provides a source of food for many birds and woodland mammals. Its open habit and hairy stems resemble horns on a male deer, giving staghorn sumac its name. Is Good For Diabetes. Shallow, wide-spreading; Habitat. You can differentiate the species by the fact that the branches of staghorn sumac have a furry texture. Wild staghorn sumac flourishes in the sandy or rocky soils along fence rows and in abandoned fields. It is a small tree or shrub that grows up to about six metres high. Spreads by root suckers to form large colonies. Staghorn sumac are in the same family as cashews (Anacardiaceae) and poison ivy. Pruning staghorn sumac For Sale/Trade . $9.99. If this plant grows in full sun, its brightly colored foliage may show evidence of bleaching. The following menu has 3 levels. If you grow a single tree as a specimen plant, count on a regular regimen of root sucker removal. Small Equipment. When it comes to sumac plants in the landscape, Tiger Eyes sumac (Rhus typhina "Bailtiger"), hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 through 8, just may take the cake. Xeriscape plant. All it needs is an abandoned field, highway median or roadside ditch and it’s happy as can be. No information available. If its colorful foliage and elegant form don't do enough to recommend it, its ease of care might. Hunting Equipment/DIY Projects. University of California Integrated Pest Management: Pests in Gardens and Landscapes -- Rhus, Lemonade Berry, Sugarbush, Sumac, Wax Tree -- Rhus Spp. Browse the curated collection and add your voice! Now, however, we are getting back to discovering the truth behind this plant. Rhus typhina Other common names: velvet sumac, hairy sumac. use escape to move to top level menu parent. Staghorn sumac grows in gardens, lawns, the edges of forests, and wasteland. Dense, fuzzy clusters of dark red fruits appear in early fall. Ideal for small spaces, "Tiger Eyes" staghorn sumac (R. typhina "Bailtiger" Tiger Eyes) has a rounded, 3- to 6-foot high and wide form. Natural Areas Conservation Training Program, Black walnut toxicity (plants tolerant of), Preventing construction damage to trees and shrubs, Trees and shrubs for the four seasons landscape, Sudden Oak Death, Ramorum Blight and Phytophthora ramorum, Eastern United States Wetlands Collection. Staghorn Sumac is the perfect informal plant for larger landscape projects. Bare Root - Prune ALL bare root plants to reduce transplant shock and ensure success. Cultivars are plants produced in cultivation by selective breeding or via vegetative propagation from wild plants identified to have desirable traits.\"Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina 'Laciniata'): Wide-spreading, colony forming reaching 8 to 10 feet high and 12 to 15 feet wide. Its finely dissected, fernlike leaves open chartreuse and brighten to golden-yellow, sometimes taking on autumnal hint of red or orange. First, it is a low growing selection growing only six feet tall and wide. Species of economic importance or medical concern found in the family include cashew ( Anacardium occidentale ), mango ( Mangifera indica ), pistachio ( Pistacia vera ), poison ivy ( Toxicodendron radicans ), and Pacific poison … Or, more accurately, staghorn sumac. Staghorn sumac is native to the eastern parts of Canada and the U.S. By late summer it has beautiful autumn-coloured foliage and the fruit is a brilliant crimson red. The plant grows 5’-6’ tall and tends to develop slightly contorted central stems that, combined with the subtly weeping foliage, produce a suggestion of Asian garden influence. They seem to always take on a dome-like shape. Habitat. Fall color is an outstanding yellow, orange and scarlet. Both grow 10 to 15 feet (3-5 m.) tall with a similar width, and have bright red fall colors. Growing Conditions. 40 STAGHORN SUMAC SEEDS - Rhus typhina $3.79. The dense conical clusters of crimson, hairy fruits on the female plant are most decorative at the end of the year. Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina):. University of California Integrated Pest Management: Pests in Gardens and Landsapes -- Sooty Mold Management, University of California Integrated Pest Management: Powdery Mildew on Ornamentals, Missouri Botanical Garden: Rhus Typhina Bailtiger "Tiger Eyes". Good erosion control plant as it spreads by root suckers forming colonies and thickets. Short-tongued bees, flies, and wasps visit the flowers for pollen, while carpenter bees occasionally burrow into the stems. Plant sumac in full sun. see more; Synonyms Rhus hirta. High salt tolerance makes staghorn sumac a candidate for wind-protected coastal and roadside planting. The colonies appear to lose vigor in about 15 years. Of some half-dozen American sumacs (Rhus spp. Nature Hills uses Plant Sentry™ to ensure we meet all federal and state guidelines. Tiger Eyes® Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina ‘Bailtiger’) is among the group of plants that elicit a strong reaction from gardeners; they either love it or they hate it.There is no middle ground. Short-tongued bees, flies, and wasps visit the flowers for pollen, while carpenter bees occasionally burrow into the stems. Saturated soil may lead to root rot. Its forked branches are covered with furry rust-red colored hairs, much like a stag’s antlers. Habit Suckering. Small Game. Large, dense terminal clusters of greenish yellow, up to 12 inches long appear in June and July. Older twigs are stout and lose their hair, but remain brown. Yes, some varieties are poisonous, but many are not, and it’s not difficult to distinguish them. Sumac will spread from root suckers. It grows in the poorest soil, as long as its roots are not waterlogged, and appears to be tolerant of the reflected heat, dust, and smoke of city gardens. One of last plants to leaf out in spring. Vivid orange to red fall color. This suckering shrub is commonly confused with saplings of the weedy, widely invasive tree-of-heaven, Ailanthus altissima---as in the one negative review below. Tolerant of black walnut toxicity and salt conditions. The Stag’s Horn sumac (Rhus typhina) was a highly popular ornamental tree grown for its branching habit and large ash-like leaves on velvety branches.The foliage, which colours to fiery red in autumn, and produces brown conical fruiting heads make it … staghorn sumac velvet sumac vinegar tree Virginian sumach see more; Synonyms Rhus hirta. STAGHORN SUMAC Rhus hirta (L.) Sudworth Plant Symbol = RHHI2 Contributed by: USDA NRCS Northeast Plant Materials Program Britton & Brown 1913 Courtesy of Kentucky Native Plant Society @ PLANTS Alternate Names Rhus typhina L. Uses Sumac serves primarily as a winter emergency food for wildlife. Because of this, staghorn sumac can make a beautiful landscape tree. Young stems are reddish-brown and densely hairy. In Missouri, staghorn sumac (introduced from states to our north and east) occurs along railroads, highways, and other open, disturbed areas.